Seniors and Home Security

Seniors and Security

 

If you’re anything like me, any changes in routine can be unsettling.  From a change in a doctors appointment, to an unexpected visit from my grandkids… I guess as you get older, your ‘Life Box’ seems to become smaller. It feels  more secure when life goes along at the regular daily pace. Your home is part of your Life Box.  Changes seem larger as we age. Most changes are fine, of course, but their effects are greater than they would have been, say, twenty years ago.

Family for Lockking Security Bars

 

The most noticeable changes are your home, car and family.  Take your car for instance.  You don’t want anyone breaking into it so you are more cautious where you park, locking it faithfully and perhaps setting an alarm.  The same concerns should apply to your home.  Knowing where all the vulnerable places are in your home and safe guarding them in what ever means you can.  You lock your door every time you leave or return.  You check all the doors at night before you go to bed.  You put sticks in the windows to prevent them from being opened from the outside.  This may seem a little paranoid, but it’s basic common sense if you don’t want home intrusion.

 

You can have an alarm system installed, but you have to remember to turn it on and off and it can be costly.  Signs outside your home indicating that you have an alarm system.  Or, possibly a sign indicating you have an unfriendly dog.  Home security brings peace of mind, particularly in hard economic times.

 

If you put sticks in your windows,  that works fine, as they are easy to move.  Your doors have their own security with a lock in the handle and a dead bolt lock.  So now you have your window and doors covered, there’s only one thing left. Not all homes have one, but most do – a sliding glass door.  Most sliding glass doors have very inadequate locks.  They can be bumped or “rocked” from the outside and become unlatched.  Of course, high end doors have better locks on them, but there’s always a way to unlatch them.  If you have a sliding glass door you might want to raise the sliding door as high as it will go to take the play or wiggle out of it.  This is done simply by screwing in or out the adjustment screws at the bottom of the door.

 

After making this adjustment,  you would still want to put in some kind of bar to prevent the door from opening if don’t feel comfortable with the latch.  There are many after-market devices for sliding glass doors from foot levers, to pins, and security bars.  When choosing a security device, remember you want it to be easy to use.  With back problems prohibiting bending up and down, or perhaps opening and closing your doors from a wheel chair, you’ll want to choose something that aids you in the task.  One of the best locks on the market comes from a company in Oregon, JTC Solutions.  Their objective is to provide a security bar that is visible as a deterrent; is easy to install, and, of course, is easy to use. LockKing Security Bars provide each of these. The LockKing can be installed at different heights in your sliding door to accommodate your needs.  Set high, they add to the security of children. In locked position, it is visible – so you can see that you remembered to lock your door.

 

Once installed, LockKing moves easily with the door because of its self-adjusting articulating features. This means it like your arm with your hand and shoulder attached to the sliding door and the side jamb.  Then your elbow is the articulating part.  When in the locked position no one can slide the door or open it from the outside.  It must be locked from the inside and therefore prevents locking yourself out.  It can’t be jimmied, and being in full sight from the outside adds a deterrent.  So check out LockKing Security Bars – read what customers have to say.  I know you will find them a lot better than any security bar on the market.lockking security bars

Comments

  1. great blog

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